Complaints

What must I do if I am not happy with a telecommunications service?

Complain directly to your service provider. Contact your service provider’s customer care department or hotline. Use all available means to resolve your complaint with your service provider.

How can I speed up resolution of my complaint?

Keep records of time and date of who you spoke to.

Can I contact the ICT Authority about my complaint?

Yes but ensure you have exhausted all means and avenues to resolve the matter with your service provider.

What must I make clear to my operator?

You can stress that you want to be treated fairly and in a reasonable timeframe.

What are my responsibilities as a consumer of a telecommunication service?

Consumers are required and advised to take time and be well informed before signing a contract; to ask questions at points of sale and to abide by the terms and conditions of the service.

What does the ICTA do when it receives my complaint?

The Authority will acknowledge receipt of your complaint and provide advice for you to resolve the complaint or where necessary refer the complaint to the appropriate Authority.

Complain directly to your service provider. Contact your service provider’s customer care department or hotline. Use all available means to resolve your complaint with your service provider.

Keep records of time and date of who you spoke to.

Yes but ensure you have exhausted all means and avenues to resolve the matter with your service provider.

You can stress that you want to be treated fairly and in a reasonable timeframe.

Consumers are required and advised to take time and be well informed before signing a contract; to ask questions at points of sale and to abide by the terms and conditions of the service.

The Authority will acknowledge receipt of your complaint and provide advice for you to resolve the complaint or where necessary refer the complaint to the appropriate Authority.

eClearance

Who can apply?

For Commercial Purposes (selling, exposing or offering for sale or hire)

 

  • A company/individual holding a valid Dealer’s Licence issued by the ICT Authority, may apply for clearance in order to market the equipment in Mauritius.

  • The manufacturer of the equipment or its representative may only apply for type approval of certain categories of equipment.

 

In order to authenticate himself on the ICTA Online Portal, the licensed Dealer will have to make use of the username and password issued by the ICT Authority for the intended purpose of TAC. First time users are required to change their password here. For any further queries regarding same, kindly contact the ICT Authority.



TAC Submission

 

Please note that licensed Dealers will need to submit a Declaration of Compliance via the ICTA online portal to obtain an e-Clearance for mobile phones. They are now required to register the TAC (Type Allocation code) of the mobile phone at the time of application for the Declaration of Compliance.

 

For Non-commercial Purposes (including for personal use and for offering as gifts)

 

  • An individual/company may apply for clearance to import ICT equipment for his own use.
How to apply?

Applications must be made through the online portal developed by the Information and Communication Technologies Authority. Applicants are required to register on the online portal using a valid email address.

 

Applicants are required to read the Guidelines, and ensure that they have all the necessary documents prior to making an application on the online portal.

 

Poster: Clearance to Import ICT Equipment

EMF

How does a mobile telephone network operate?

A mobile telephone network is a wireless network distributed over land areas called cells. Each cell has its
own base station which sends and receives radio signals through its specified area.
Mobile telephones operate by sending and receiving low power RF signals to and from the base stations.
The base stations are linked to the rest of the mobile and fixed telephone networks and pass the signal/
call onto those networks.
In Mauritius, the frequency bands at which mobile telephones transmit are 900 and 1800 MHz for the
GSM (Global System for Mobile Communication) network, 800 MHz for the CDMA (Code Division
Multiple Access) network and 2100 MHz for the UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunications System)
network, which is also known as 3G.

What is a base station?

A base station is the infrastructure which enables telecommunication companies to offer mobile services through a network. 

To provide a good quality mobile service, base stations need to be located where people use their mobile telephones. The number of base stations required for a given area will depend on the terrain and other surrounding obstructions like trees and buildings and the number of people using mobile telephones in that area.

Antennas of base stations are often located on existing structures and on the roof tops of buildings to minimise the visual impact of the facility and to use the available height to achieve coverage objectives and to minimise mobile telephone coverage ‘black spots’. Base stations produce very weak radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure levels.

What are radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF/RF)?

Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) transfer electromagnetic energy by radio waves. EMF is part

of everyday life and occurs naturally (emissions from the sun, the earth and the ionosphere) or artificially.

Artificial sources include:-

  • Mobile telephone base stations
  • Broadcast towers
  • Electrical and electronic equipment
  • Remote controls

 

Radiofrequency (EMF) is a non-ionising radiation, which means that it has insufficient energy to

break the chemical bonds in an atom or molecule. In contrast, ionising radiation, such as X-rays, can strip

electrons from atoms and molecules, thereby changing the molecular structure that can lead to damage in

biological tissue. Given that each type of ionisation interacts differently with the human body, care must be

taken so as not to confuse the terms ‘ionising’ and ‘non-ionising’ radiation.

What are authorised RF field levels?

International health and safety guidelines are in place to limit public exposure to radio waves from base
stations and mobile telephones. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has formally recognised the
International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) to develop the international
EMF exposure guidelines. The international guidelines developed by ICNIRP are based on a careful analysis
of published scientific literature (which covers research on both thermal and non-thermal effects) and offer
protection against all identified hazards of RF energy with large safety margins.
The table below gives examples of reference levels for specified technologies used for deploying mobile
networks. These are derived from the ICNIRP basic limits of exposure of human beings to electromagnetic
fields for comparison against measured electromagnetic fields. Measurements below the reference level
guarantee that the basic limits of exposure are not exceeded. These reference levels have been adopted by
the ICTA pursuant to section 18(1) (n) of the ICT Act 2001 (as amended) and in accordance with ITU-T(2)
Recommendation K.52.


(2) The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) is the United Nations specialized agency for information and communication technologies. One of the three sectors of the ITU is the ITU Telecommunication
Standardization Sector (ITU-T).

Are mobile telephone base stations a health risk?

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO):
• Biological effects are measurable responses to a stimulus or to a change in the environment.
These changes are not necessarily harmful to health.
• Ongoing change forms a normal part of our lives.
• Changes that are irreversible and stress the organism for long periods of time may constitute
a health hazard.
• An adverse health effect causes detectable impairment of the health of the exposed individual
or of his or her offspring.
• A biological effect on the other hand, may or may not result in an adverse health effect.
Based on the weight of international scientiffiic opinion, the WHO has concluded that there is no
substantiated evidence that living near a mobile telephone antenna causes adverse health effects.

What is the Deployment of Radiocommunication Infrastructure Technical and Administrative Standard for Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Safety?

The Standard makes it imperative for operators to adopt forward planning for the installation of RF
infrastructure to cater for the expected rise in the number of antennas due to the foreseeable growth in
demand for mobile telephony services and good network coverage in Mauritius.

Are emissions from mobile telephone base stations monitored?

In 2009, the ICTA adopted an in-situ measurement protocol for the determination of RF fields (300 MHz
– 6GHz) in the vicinity of base stations for the evaluation of general public exposure to electromagnetic
fields.
The ICTA performs measurements as per the abovementioned protocol upon request from Local
Authorities or the general public.
The ICTA has initiated a project whereby regular monitoring of the emissions from mobile telephone base
stations will be effected around the island. The measured levels will then be made publicly available on the
website of the ICTA.

Are mobile telephones safe?

According to a WHO Fact Sheet N°193 of June 2011 studies have been conducted over the last two decades to assess whether mobile telephones pose a potential health risk. According to the information in the WHO Fact Sheet to date, no adverse health effects have been established for mobile telephone use. The Fact Sheet also mentions that the WHO intends to conduct a formal risk assessment of all studied health outcomes from radiofrequency fields exposure by 2012.

(http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs193/en/index.html)

 

On 31 May 2011, however, according to press release N°208 of the International Agency for  Research on Cancer (IARC), the WHO and the IARC classified radiofrequency electromagnetic fields “as possibly carcinogenic to humans (Group 2B) based on an increased risk for glioma, a malignant type of brain cancer, associated with wireless telephone use”.

 

For more information on this subject please consult the www.who.int and www.iarc.fr

Are emissions from mobile telephones regulated?

Emissions from mobile telephones in Mauritius have been limited to a Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of
2 W/kg of tissue (averaged over 10 grams) in compliance with the EN 50360:2001 standard. The SAR is
defined as the rate at which a mobile telephone user absorbs energy from the handset.
As from 1 February 2010, all mobile telephones imported in Mauritius for sale should have been type
approved by the ICTA and should have shown compatibility with the EN 50360:2001 standard. A list of
type approved mobile telephones, including their respective SAR information is available from the ICTA
website (http://www.icta.mu). Moreover, as from 1 July 2010, licensed dealers have the obligation to affix
the maximum SAR on the box of mobile telephones sold and in the user’s manual of the mobile telephone
or on a separate sheet in the mobile telephone box

What can be done to minimise RF field exposure from mobile telephones?

The WHO’s advice as given in Fact Sheet N°193 of May 2010 is as follows:-
“A person using a mobile telephone 30–40 cm away from their body – for example when text messaging, accessing
the Internet, or using a “hands free” device – will therefore have a much lower exposure to radiofrequency fields
than someone holding the handset against their head.
In addition to using “hands-free” devices, which keep mobile telephones away from the head and body during
telephone calls, exposure is also reduced by limiting the number and length of calls. Using the telephone in areas
of good reception also decreases exposure as it allows the telephone to transmit at reduced power. The use of
commercial devices for reducing radiofrequency field exposure has not been shown to be effective.”

What is the ICTA doing to ensure EMF safety?

Under section 18 (1) (n) of the ICT Act 2001 (as amended), the ICTA
has the legal mandate to “ensure the safety and quality of every information
and communication services including telecommunication service and, for
that purpose, determine technical standards for telecommunication network,
the connection of customer equipment to telecommunication networks”.
Since 2009, the ICTA has been committed to setting up the
appropriate regulatory framework with a view to ensuring EMF
safety. Below are some of the actions taken by the ICTA as part of
this endeavour:
1. The ICTA informs the community about EMF safety.
This Guide is an example of a communication tool used by the
regulator
2. The ICTA has issued the mandatory technical and administrative Standard
(ICTA/STD/2011/01) for operators with respect to the deployment of
radiocommunications infrastructure
3. The ICTA evaluates base stations prior to authorising their deployment in accordance
with the International Telecommunication Union Standardization Bureau (ITU-T)
Recommendation K.52
4. Through its type approval process, the ICTA ensures that mobile telephones
commercialised in Mauritius comply with internationally recognised health and safety
standards for electromagnetic fields
5. The ICTA has been conducting in-situ measurements upon request since 2009 and has
embarked on a project whereby EMF levels across Mauritius will be monitored regularly
and published on the ICTA website
6. The ICTA also entertains complaints from the public with respect to EMF safety.

What actions can be initiated where a site which has been notified in accordance with clause 6.3 of the Standard after the 23 September 2011 does not comply with the Standard?

Whenever there are good reasons to believe that
there is non-compliance, the first step is to file a written
complaint to the operator of the site. For the purpose of
the Standard, a complaint is deemed to be an expression
of dissatisfaction or grievance made in writing. A
complainant may send the complaint by email, post or
fax. Operators are required to assist the complainant in
making the complaint, if needs be.
Where a complainant is not satisfied with the operator’s
response, he/she may report the matter to the ICTA.
The ICTA may look into the complaint and may direct
the operator to take remedial actions, if any.
When making a complaint, the material facts committed
by the operator should be set out as clearly as possible
with reference to the relevant sections of the Deployment
of Radiocommunication Infrastructure Technical and
Administrative Standard for Electromagnetic Field
(EMF) Safety which the complainant has good reasons to
believe may have been breached.

What can a complainant do if he/she wishes the ICTA to effect EMF measurements at his/her premises?

Should a complainant wish the ICTA to effect EMF measurements at his/her premises with respect to base
stations located in his/her neighbourhood, a written request shall be made to the ICTA.
The ICTA will ensure that the said base stations are in their normal operating conditions and arrange for
the most appropriate time to effect the measurements prior to giving the complainant at least 48 hours
advance notice.
On the day of the measurements, the
complainant will have to be at home
or make arrangements to be duly
represented as the measurements
will usually be effected inside the
complainant’s premises in the rooms
facing the base stations. Officers of
the ICTA will call at the complainant’s
premises and will briefly explain
to the complainant or to his/her
representative, the process they will
follow. They will also request the
complainant or his/her representative
to sign an inspection declaration form.
The ICTA will inform the complainant
of its findings by way of letter at its
earliest convenience.

8-digit Numbering

What will happen on the 1st September 2013 at 00.00hrs?

All numbers assigned to mobile networks in the Republic of Mauritius will migrate from 7 digits to 8 digits.

What then do I have to do when I dial a mobile number?

When you dial whether from a mobile or a fixed phone, place a 5 in front of the existing mobile number.

When do I have to add 5?

As from 00.00hrs of 1st September 2013 (as from midnight of 31st August 2013 into 00.00hrs of 1st September 2013)

What will happen if I do not add the 5 in front of existing mobile numbers?

You will not be able to make your call or send an SMS.

If somebody else calls as from 00.00hrs of 1st September 2013, on my 7-digit number without adding 5, will the call come through?
  1. The caller will hear an announcement that the call did not go through. The caller will then need to add 5 and dial again.
For how long after the 1st September 2013 will the announcements be played for callers who are still dialing 7-digits?

The announcements will be played for one month for the local audience and three months for the international audience.

Both local and international callers will have an announcement to add 5 and dial again.

If I will be on International Roaming during the migration, will callers still get the announcement?

YES. Wherever you are during the transition period, if callers are still phoning you on the 7-digit number, they will hear the announcements to add 5 and dial again.

Will the caller be charged for the announcement is being played?

NO. The caller will not be charged for the announcement.

If as from 00.00hrs of 1st September 2013, I send an SMS on a 7-digit number and it is not delivered, will I get a notification message to inform me to add 5 and send the message again?

NO. There will not be any notification message to ask you to add 5.

If as from 00.00hrs of 1st September 2013, I send an SMS on a 7-digit number and it is not delivered, will I be charged for this?

You are advised to contact your operator.

If I call someone on his/her mobile number but I am using a fixed phone, do I have to add a 5?

YES. Because his/her mobile number is operating on a mobile network.

Will fixed phone numbers also migrate to 8-digits?

NO. The migration will be for numbers operating on mobile networks only. Fixed numbers will remain the same.

Who has to change the numbers in my contact lists on my mobile phone?

You will need to add the Leading Digit 5 to your contacts’ numbers operating on mobile networks. The numbers of your contacts which operate on fixed/landline networks remain the same.

Can I start changing my contact list now?

You are advised to wait till the 1st September 2013 when the migration to 8-digits comes into effect.

Will I lose the credit on my prepaid phone account during the migration?

NO. You will not lose your credit.

What do mobile networks mean?

Mobile networks are networks which do not have a physical wire connected to your telephone set or device.

If I use equipment or a device such as a dongle which operates on a mobile network other than a mobile phone, how do I change the number?

For such equipment, the mobile operators will adjust this for you. For further information, you can also contact your operators.

Will the leading digit 5 apply to all mobile phone operators in the Republic of Mauritius?

YES. As from 00.00hrs of 1st September 2013, all mobile numbers assigned by any mobile phone operators within Mauritius, Rodrigues, Agalega and Saint Brandon will start with the leading digit 5.

Will there be a downtime during the migration period?

The migration will start as from 00.00hrs of 1st September 2013 and will last for around 4 hours.

Can I make or receive calls/ SMS on my mobile phone during the migration period?

You are strongly advised to use a fixed phone for any emergency calls during the migration period.

Will there be a change for emergency numbers?

NO. Emergency numbers will remain the same.

How will international callers be made aware of the migration?

The International Telecommunication Union has been informed to notify its member states. Furthermore, the ICT Authority has informed all Embassies/ Consulates and International Organizations of this migration.

Why is the migration to 8 digits required?

The current numbering plan for numbers assigned to mobile networks is nearly depleted. The 8-digit numbering plan will cater for the growing demand of numbers assigned to mobile networks.

Where can I call should I wish to have more information?

You can call the ICTA’s hotline on 161 or consult the website of the Authority at the following address: http://www.icta.mu

You may also contact your operator for more details.

Complain directly to your service provider. Contact your service provider’s customer care department or hotline. Use all available means to resolve your complaint with your service provider.

Keep records of time and date of who you spoke to.

Yes but ensure you have exhausted all means and avenues to resolve the matter with your service provider.

You can stress that you want to be treated fairly and in a reasonable timeframe.

Consumers are required and advised to take time and be well informed before signing a contract; to ask questions at points of sale and to abide by the terms and conditions of the service.

The Authority will acknowledge receipt of your complaint and provide advice for you to resolve the complaint or where necessary refer the complaint to the appropriate Authority.

CSA Filtering

What is a URL?

URL stands for Uniform Resource Locator. It is an internet address (for example, http://www.icta.mu/internet), usually consisting of the access protocol (e.g. http), the domain name (e.g. www.icta.mu), and optionally, the path to a file or resource residing on that server (e.g. internet for the address given above).

What is an internet service provider?

An internet service provider (ISP) is a company, organisation or other entity which provides a person or a device access to the internet, internet connectivity and other related services (e.g. hosting websites).

What is an online content filtering system?

An online filtering system is a piece of hardware or software or a combination of both that acts as a shield between the Internet and a user’s computer, thus filtering access to potentially objectionable or offensive material. Most content filter manufacturers compile a list of sites they deem objectionable and classify them under different profiles, which often pertain to the end user’s age.

Which laws are relevant?

Section 15 of the Child Protection Act 1994 as amended, whereby emphasis is laid on “indecent photographs of children” and section 18(1)(m) of the ICT Act 2001 as amended where one the functions of the ICT Authority is to take steps to regulate or curtail harmful and illegal content on Internet and other information and communication services.

Why implement the CSA filtering system?

Under section 18 (1) (m) of the ICT Act 2001, one of the functions of the ICT Authority is to take steps to regulate or curtail harmful and illegal content on the Internet and other information and communication services.  Thus the contents being filtered out by the system are materials that fall within the ambit of Section 15 of the Child Protection Act.

What is the purpose of this filtering system?

The aim is to reduce the availability and circulation of child sexual abuse images and limit the trauma experienced by victims’ when such images circulate on the internet.  At the same time, this system protects against accidental viewing, giving people in Mauritius the confidence in the Internet they deserve.

Where is the system hosted?

The system setup is presently hosted at the ICT Authority and is connected to local ISPs providing internet access to the public in Mauritius.

Which ISPs use the filtering?

Emtel Ltd, Data Communications Ltd, Mauritius Telecom. In fact, all Internet traffic coming into Mauritius are filtered out for CSA contents.

What system is used to do the filtering?

The software is Netclean Whitebox, the leader in providing child online safety protection.

What sites are being stopped by this filtering system?

The NetClean WhiteBox solution uses a URL black list containing the addresses of sites that are to be filtered. This URL filtering list emanates from the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF), a non profit organisation that is widely recognised as one of the best in the world at managing a URL list of CSA sites coupled with the Interpol blacklist.

Is it possible to modify the URL blacklist?

No, the list is automatically updated on a regular basis remotely by the online CSA filtering solution provider and modification of this list is not possible. Access or modification to the blacklist is not possible locally.

What happens if a user logs in to a banned site?

You will see a message saying that access to the site has been banned. Instead an ICTA blockpage will be displayed.

What happens if there are multiple sites on a server and only one of them is banned?

The filter is applied at the level of the internet address but it is common for a web server to host multiple websites on a single internet address. All requests to any of the sites on one of the filtered internet addresses will be diverted to the filtering server.

The filtering server then looks at the request. If it is to a banned site, the request is refused and a message is sent back to the person. The remaining sites which are not banned can still be viewed.

It is possible to filter down to the level of folders or even individual documents and images on a website. E.g. you could filter http://www.website.com/badcontent but allow http://www.website.com/goodcontent.

Will internet filtering slow down the internet?

The filtering is implemented in such a way that it has very little effect on the passage of most network traffic meaning that there is little downgrade on performance.

What types of materials are filtered?

The filtering solution is used to filter only child pornography including video, photos, and text articles.

Is it possible to check whether a site is on the filtered list?

The only way to check whether the website is filtered is by attempting to access it.

Does this stop even the most determined people from looking at sexually abusive images of children?

This initiative is one element in a wider effort to combat the making and distribution of images of child sexual abuse via the Internet and the activities of determined criminals who exploit internet-based technologies and services to this end. Filtering is designed to protect people from inadvertent access to potentially criminal images of child sexual abuse. No known technology is capable of effectively denying determined criminals who are actively seeking such material; only removal of the content at source can achieve that goal.

PUBLIC KEY INFRASTRUCTURE (PKI)

What is PKI?

PKI stands for Public Key Infrastructure. To enable the use of digital signatures in an open environment (such as the Internet) where the participants do not know each other, it is necessary to know who the signer is.   PKI is a system created for this purpose and in this system a reliable third party issues an digital certificate. The certificate contains information about the person to whom the certificate is issued to. PKI uses a key pair, in which one key is public and the other is private. The system is based on asymmetric encryption. The signer signs the message with a private key, known only by the signer. The recipient can verify the authenticity of the signature and the integrity of the message with the public key given in the certificate.

 

For more information click here.

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